Image Size


You want the largest file size available. The size is directly proportional to resolution and quality. Now you can skip to the next topic.

“[Our] pricing is based in part on the image dimensions, so it’s often in your best interest to provide an image in the largest pixel dimensions possible.”
iStockphoto

Megapixels (MP)

“The size requirement for new contributors is 4.0MP.”
— Shutterstock

Megapixels (shortened to MP) is the measurement for the resolution of photos. photos are created with pixels, which are PICture ELements, individual blocks of color.The bigger the better is a general guide for quality and stock sales.

“iStock accepts files 1600 x 1200 pixels or larger. Any file smaller than 1600 x 1200 pixels will be declined.”
iStockphoto

The minimum image size that iStock will accept is 1600 pixels by 1200 pixels. 1600 x1200= 1,920,000 which is about two million pixels total, so we call that 2 megapixels, or 2MP for short. Shutterstock wants at least 4MP.

Your camera is likely to be better than that, so you can submit photos to iStock and Shutterstock.

How Come The File Size Is Smaller?

They are different measurements. File size is in MB, megabits. It includes extra data such as bits for color, and the image is compressed by the JPEG format. The amount of compression depends on the image — a blank image with little data can be compressed to a smaller file size.

Megapixels and Print Size

MegapixelsPixel Resolution*CameraPrint size @300ppi Print size @200ppi

4

2464 x 16328.21" x 5.44"12.32" x 8.16"

6

3008 x 200010.02" x 6.67"15.04" x 10.00"

8

3264 x 244810.88" x 8.16"16.32" x 12.24"

10

3872 x 2592Nikon D20012.91" x 8.64"19.36" x 12.96"

12

4290 x 280014.30" x 9.34"21.45" x 14.00"

16

4928 x 3264Nikon D7000, D510016.43" x 10.88"24.64" x 16.32"

18

5184 x 3456Canon 7D17.28" x 11.52"15.92" x 17.28"

19

5380 x 362035mm film17.93" x 12.06"26.90" x 18.10"

21

5616 x 3744Canon 1D, 5D18.72" x 12.48"28.08" x 18.72"

24

6048 x 4032Nikon D3X20.16" x 13.44"30.24" x 20.16"
*Typical Resolution. Actual pixel dimensions vary from camera to camera.
ppi=Pixels Per Inch, similar to DPI

How Come The File Size Is Smaller?

They are different measurements. File size is in MB, megabits. It includes extra data such as bits for color, and the image is compressed by the JPEG format. The amount of compression depends on the image — a blank image with little data can be compressed to a smaller file size.

Comments


Reply by Anonymous

November 1, 2015

I want to convert my pic size to 4.0mb, it is currently 4.4, how do i resize it?


Reply by Andrew Hudson, PhotoSecrets

January 11, 2016

I resize photos in Photoshop, and also in Preview on a Mac (Tools > Adjust Size). Most image-editing programs and apps can resize images. There are also many websites that can do this for free online.


Reply by Shally

October 4, 2014

I have 1.8mb jpeg photos each one is 1.8mb, how can i make these 3MP? its film that was put on a cd and saved to my email. its not a digital camera some of the shots are 560KB, i dont have access to photoshop yet


Reply by Andrew Hudson, PhotoSecrets

October 8, 2014

Hi Shally,

Drag the image file onto your Internet browser. The pixel dimensions should be displayed in the title/tab bar. If the numbers are greater than 2124 x 1416 (for a horizontal 3:2 image), then your image is greater than 3MP and sufficient to submit to Dreamstime.

Note that there are two confusingly similar ways to describe an image file: MP and MB. Dreamstime cares about MP, not (necessarily) MB.

MP (megapixels) is the size of the image, in pixels (picture elements). An image which is 3,000 pixels wide and 1,000 pixels high is 3,000 x 1,000=3,000,000=3 million pixels=3MP. MP describes the resolution of the image.

MB (megabytes) is the size of the data file; how much space it will take up on a hard drive. This depends on how the image file is encoded. For example, a 3MP image could be:

  • 1MB JPEG (compressed, 100%, 24bit/pixel)
  • 2.4MB PNG (lossless compressed, 24bit/pixel)
  • 4.5MB RAW (uncompressed, 12bit/pixel)
  • 18MB TIFF (CMYK, uncompressed, 48bit/pixel)

So the MB file size doesn’ directly tell us about image resolution.

Stock agencies, such as Dreamstime, care about MP. Dreamstime requires a minimum of 3MP, which is 2124 pixels x 1416 pixels (on a standard 35mm image with an aspect ratio of 2:3). This makes a 4”x6” print at 350dpi.

In your case, we need to see what the MP image size is. A 1.8MB JPEG image could be around 6MP (3000 x 2000 pixels). So you would be OK.

Best wishes,

Andrew


Reply by Beth

August 15, 2012

I have some photos that I took several years ago with a digital camera. I tried to submit them but they are under 4mp and got rejected. How can I tell what MP they jpg file actually are, and is there a way to increase the # of MP’s for each file/photo so they are at least 4mp? Or is there another way to copy/create the files to they are 4mp? Thanks!


Reply by Andrew Hudson, PhotoSecrets

August 23, 2012

Hi Beth:

Unfortunately your photos are just too small; you’ll have to take new photos on a different camera. You can find the image size by opening the photo in a browser or photo editor and finding the pixel dimensions. A 4MP image is about 2,400 pixels by 1,800 pixels. Check out this megapixel calculator.

There are programs that can upsize your photos. But microstock agencies do not accept such photos (as there is no true added data, it is just extrapolated from the old data). So you need to use a higher-resolution camera.


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