PhotoSecrets Athens

A Photographer’s Guide

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Athens
A Photographer’s Guide
Andrew Hudson

Photos

Athens

78 views to photograph
from Hill of the MusesKonstantinos Dafalias/Flickr
Temple of Olympian ZeusKevin Poh/Flickr
Porch of the CaryatidsRenate Dodell/Flickr
Ephebus of AntikytheraTilemahos Efthimiadis/Flickr
from northwestDennis Jarvis/Flickr
Odeon of Herodes AtticusWikimedia Nikthestunned/Wikipedia
Tomb of The Unknown soldierJaume Escofet/Flickr
detail eastRoger/Flickr
ErechtheionJeffrey/Flickr
Gate of Athena ArchegetisC Messier/Wikipedia
Hadrian’s LibraryCarole Raddato/Flickr
Monument of the Eponymous HeroesDennis Jarvis/Wikipedia
National Library of GreeceA Savin/Wikipedia
Old Royal PalaceThomas Wolf/Wikipedia
Panathenaic StadiumBadseed/Wikipedia
Panteion UniversityNikolaos Diakidis/Wikipedia
Plato and SocratesSébastien Bertrand/Flickr
ruins under entranceTomisti/Wikipedia
Stoa of AttalosDel mich/Flickr
Temple of Athena NikeTilemahos Efthimiadis/Flickr
Tetraconch ChurchAndy Hay/Flickr
Academy of AthensA Savin/Wikipedia
Acropolis MuseumIosk/Wikipedia
Arch of HadrianJoanbanjo/Wikipedia
Archaeological Museum of PiraeusDenghiùcomm/Wikipedia
from AreopagusAndy Hay/Flickr
Athens Olympic VelodromeTilemahos Efthimiadis/Wikipedia
Choragic Monument of LysicratesC Messier/Wikipedia
Church of the Holy ApostlesJebulon/Wikipedia
detail southeastDavid Abercrombie/Flickr
Georgios AverofPmoshs/Wikipedia
Lycabettus FunicularA Savin/Wikipedia
Museum of Acropolis StudiesTheusmanmali/Wikipedia
National GardenSjaak Kempe/Flickr
Theatre of DionysusCarole Raddato/Flickr
Tower of the WindsJoanbanjo/Wikipedia
University of Athens DeaneryThomas Wolf/Wikipedia
Church of the PantanassaC Messier/Wikipedia
from the Hill of the MusesCarole Raddato/Wikipedia
Monastiraki SquareGeorgekok-Greece/Wikipedia
Odeon of AgrippaJanmad/Wikipedia

Contents

Maps

Athens

Acropolis

Acropolis Museum

East

Greater Athens

North

About PhotoSecrets

 
 
 

Foreword

A great travel photo­graph requires you to be in the right place at the right time to capture that special moment. Professional photo­graphers have a short-hand phrase for this: “F8 and be there.”

There are countless books that can help you with photo­graphic technique, the “F8” portion of that equation. But until now, there’s been little help for the other, more critical portion of that equation, the “be there” part. To find the right spot, you had to expend lots of time and shoe leather to essentially re-invent the wheel.

In my career as a professional travel photo­grapher, well over half my time on location is spent seeking out the good angles. Andrew Hudson’s PhotoSecrets does all that legwork for you, so you can spend your time photo­graphing instead of wandering about. I wish I had one of these books for every city I photo­graph on assignment.

PhotoSecrets can help you capture the most beautiful sights with a minimum of hassle and a maximum of enjoyment. So grab your camera, find your favorite PhotoSecrets spots, and “be there!”

About Bob Krist

Bob Krist has photo­graphed assignments for National Geographic, National Geographic Traveler, Travel/­Holiday, Smithsonian, and Islands. He won “Travel photo­grapher of the Year” from the Society of American Travel Writers in 1994, 2007, and 2008.

For National Geographic, Bob has led round-the-world tours and a traveling lecture series. His book In Tuscany with Frances Mayes spent a month on The New York Times’ bestseller list and his how-to book Spirit of Place was hailed by American Photo­grapher magazine as “the best book about travel photo­graphy we’ve ever read.”

The parents of three sons, Bob and his wife live in New Hope, Pennsylvania.

Welcome

Thank you for reading PhotoSecrets. As a fellow fan of travel and photo­graphy, I hope this guide will help you quickly find the most visually stunning places, and come home with equally stunning photo­graphs.

PhotoSecrets is designed to show you all the best sights. Flick through, see the classic views, and use them as a departure point for your own creations. Flick through, enjoy the photos, and see which places inspire you. Get comp­osition ideas, lighting tips, and a brief history. It’ll be like traveling with a location scout and a pro-photo­grapher by your side.

The idea for PhotoSecrets came during a trip to Thailand, when I tried to find the exotic beach used in the James Bond movie The Man with the Golden Gun. None of the guidebooks I had showed a picture, so I thought a guidebook of postcard photos would be useful for us photographers. If you have any ides for improvements, please send me an email at ahudson@photosecrets.com.

Now, start exploring — and take lots of photos!

About Andrew Hudson

Originally an engineer, Andrew Hudson started PhotoSecrets in 1995. His first book won the Benjamin Franklin Award for Best First Book and his second won the Grand Prize in the National Self-Published Book Awards.

Andrew has published 15 nationally-distributed photo­graphy books. He has photo­graphed assignments for Macy’s, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Men’s Health and Seventeen, and been a location scout for Nikon. His photos and articles have appeared in Alaska Airlines, National Geographic Traveler, Shutterbug Outdoor and Nature photo­graphy, Where, and Woman’s World.

Andrew has a degree in Computer Engineering from Manchester University and a certificate in copyright law from Harvard Law School. Born in Redditch, England, he lives with his wife, two kids, and two chocolate Labs, in San Diego, California.

Introduction

At a Glance

Name:Athens
GPS:37.967, 23.717
Greek:Athína
Country:Greece
Region:Attica
History:one of the world’s oldest cities
Fame:capital and largest city of Greece
Contribution:cradle of Western civilization; birthplace of democracy
Population:City 664,046 (2011)
Metro 3,090,508 (2011)
Olympics:host city of the first modern-day Olympic Games in 1896
Web:cityofathens.gr

Athens is the capital and largest city of Greece. Athens dominates the Attica region and is one of the world’s oldest cities, with its recorded history spanning over 3,400 years and its earliest human presence starting somewhere between the 11th and 7th millennium BC.

Classical Athens was a powerful city-state that emerged in conjunction with the seagoing development of the port of Piraeus, which had been a distinct city prior to its 5th century BC incorporation with Athens. A centre for the arts, learning and philosophy, home of Plato’s Academy and Aristotle’s Lyceum, it is widely referred to as the cradle of Western civilization and the birthplace of democracy, largely because of its cultural and political impact on the European continent, and in particular the Romans. In modern times, Athens is a large cosmopolitan metropolis and central to economic, financial, industrial, maritime, political and cultural life in Greece. In 2012, Athens was ranked the world’s 39th richest city by purchasing power and the 67th most expensive in a UBS study.

Athens is a global city and one of the biggest economic centres in southeastern Europe. It has a large financial sector, and its port Piraeus is both the largest passenger port in Europe, and the second largest in the world. The Municipality of Athens (also City of Athens) had a population of 664,046 (in 2011) within its administrative limits, and a land area of 38.96 km (15.04 sq mi). The urban area of Athens (Greater Athens and Greater Piraeus) extends beyond its administrative municipal city limits, with a population of 3,090,508 (in 2011) over an area of 412 km (159 sq mi). According to Eurostat in 2011, the functional urban area (FUA) of Athens was the 9th most populous FUA in the European Union (the 6th most populous capital city of the EU), with a population of 3.8 million people. Athens is also the southernmost capital on the European mainland.

The heritage of the classical era is still evident in the city, represented by ancient monuments and works of art, the most famous of all being the Parthenon, considered a key landmark of early Western civilization. The city also retains Roman and Byzantine monuments, as well as a smaller number of Ottoman monuments.

Athens is home to two UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the Acropolis of Athens and the medieval Daphni Monastery. Landmarks of the modern era, dating back to the establishment of Athens as the capital of the independent Greek state in 1834, include the Hellenic Parliament and the so-called “architectural trilogy of Athens,” consisting of the National Library of Greece, the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and the Academy of Athens. Athens is also home to several museums and cultural institutions, such as the National Archeological Museum, featuring the world’s largest collection of ancient Greek antiquities, the Acropolis Museum, the Museum of Cycladic Art, the Benaki Museum and the Byzantine and Christian Museum. Athens was the host city of the first modern-day Olympic Games in 1896, and 108 years later it welcomed home the 2004 Summer Olympics.

Wikipedia

The Acropolis of Athens is an ancient citadel located on a rocky outcrop above the city of Athens and contains the remains of several ancient buildings of great architectural and historic significance, the most famous being the Parthenon.

The word acropolis is from the Greek words akron (“highest point, extremity”) and polis (“city”). Although the term acropolis is generic and there are many other acropoleis in Greece, the significance of the Acropolis of Athens is such that it is commonly known as “The Acropolis” without qualification. During ancient times it was known also more properly as Cecropia, after the legendary serpent-man, Cecrops, the first Athenian king.

While there is evidence that the hill was inhabited as far back as the fourth millennium BC, it was Pericles (c. 495 — 429 BC) in the fifth century BC who coordinated the construction of the site’s most important present remains including the Parthenon, the Propylaia, the Erechtheion and the Temple of Athena Nike. The Parthenon and the other buildings were damaged seriously during the 1687 siege by the Venetians during the Morean War when gunpowder being stored in the Parthenon was hit by a cannonball and exploded.

Wikipedia

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The Ancient Agora of Classical Athens is the best-known example of an ancient Greek agora, a central public space in ancient Greek city-states. The Agora’s initial use was for a commercial, assembly, or residential gathering place.

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Piraeus is a port city in the region of Attica, Greece. Piraeus is located within the Athens urban area, 12 kilometres (7 miles) southwest from its city center (municipality of Athens), and lies along the east coast of the Saronic Gulf.

According to the 2011 census, Piraeus had a population of 163,688 people within its administrative limits, making it the fourth largest municipality in Greece and the second largest within the urban area of the Greek capital, following the municipality of Athens. The municipality of Piraeus and several other suburban municipalities within the regional unit of Piraeus form the greater Piraeus area, with a total population of 448,997.

Wikipedia

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Index

More Info

More information will be available from:

  • App (coming sometime)
  • ebook (coming sometime)
  • Printed book (coming sometime)