PhotoSecrets Iceland

A Photographer’s Guide

Best classic places spots hotspots sites sights views photo locations to photograph for photography with maps postcard photos cool beautiful pictures

ICELAND
A Photographer’s Guide
Andrew Hudson

Photos

Seljalandsfoss classic inside caveDiego Delso/Wikipedia

Iceland

252 views to photograph
Dettifoss east bank at sunsetThomas Lusth/Shutterstock
Dettifoss from east with personCanadastock/Shutterstock
Goðafoss from eastAndreas Tille/Wikipedia
Goðafoss from northFilip Fuxa/Shutterstock
Seljalandsfoss from inside cave sunset/sunriseRomanSlavik/Shutterstock
Seljalandsfoss from leftFilip Fuxa/Shutterstock
Skógafoss with personKavram/Shutterstock
Dynjandi from aboveDiego Delso/Wikipedia
Dynjandi from straight onDiego Delso/Wikipedia
Glymur from westAndreas Tille/Wikipedia
Gullfoss from rightThomas Lusth/Shutterstock
Gullfoss from southwestDiego Delso/Wikipedia
Kotstrond ChurchJack Torcello/Flickr
Seljalandsfoss straight on leftishBatintherain/Flickr
Skógafoss straight onCanadastock/Shutterstock
Skógafoss with rainbowPavelSvoboda/Shutterstock
The Sun VoyagerO Palsson/Flickr
UppsprettaDejo/Wikipedia
BreiðamerkurjökullAndreas Tille/Wikipedia
Church of SkagaströndBromr/Wikipedia
DeildartunguhverNojhan/Wikipedia
Dettifoss from westAborchersen/Wikipedia
Dynjandi from afarDiego Delso/Wikipedia
Dynjandi from rightBoaworm/Wikipedia
Dynjandi from right belowBoaworm/Wikipedia
FjaðrárgljúfurKavram/Shutterstock
Fríkirkjan í ReykjavíkDiego Delso/Wikipedia
GarðakirkjaSteinn/Wikipedia
Glymur from southGollom/Wikipedia
Goðafoss from northeastMartin-D/Wikipedia
Gullfoss fab view higher upDiego Delso/Wikipedia
Gullfoss fab view highest upDiego Delso/Wikipedia
Gullfoss from leftDiego Delso/Wikipedia
HjálparfossBromr/Wikipedia
Hraunhafnartangi lighthouseTommybee/Wikipedia
Mývatn Nature BathsBruce Mcadam/Wikipedia
ÓfærufossGummao/Wikipedia
Þjóðveldisbærinn StöngThomas Ormston Ormstont/Wikipedia
ÞorlákshöfnTommybee/Wikipedia
Seljalandsfoss from rightKaterina Sysoeva/Shutterstock
Seljalandsfoss from right verticalKonrad Zeltner/Wikipedia
Seljalandsfoss from right vertical closerRomanSlavik/Shutterstock
Seljalandsfoss inside cave right verticalDiego Delso/Wikipedia
Seljalandsfoss poolD Futato/Wikipedia
Seljalandsfoss straight onMatito/Flickr
Seljalandsfoss straight on leftishDiego Delso/Wikipedia
Seljalandsfoss straight on rightishCGP Grey/Flickr
Skógafoss from further awayS 73/Wikipedia
Skógafoss from furthest away with sheepEmstrur/Wikipedia
SystrafossBromr/Wikipedia
GrundarfjörðurDiego Delso/Wikipedia
HvannadalshnúkurGummao/Wikipedia
KirkjubæjarklausturGino Maccanti/Wikipedia
Öræfajökull and Hvannadalshnjúkur as seen from SkaftafellGummao/Wikipedia
ReykjanesbærEmstrur/Wikipedia
Seljalandsfoss distant leftishHolt/Wikipedia
SeyðisfjörðurIra Goldstein/Wikipedia
SnæfellsnesKfk/Wikipedia
HaukadalurR71/Wikipedia
HveragerðiShw4ah/Wikipedia
ÖræfajökullGiåm/Wikipedia
Reykholt [Western Iceland]Holt/Wikipedia
ReykjahlíðChmee2/Wikipedia
Vík í MýrdalBoaworm/Wikipedia

Maps

Map of Iceland

Contents

About PhotoSecrets

 
 
 

Foreword

A great travel photo­graph requires you to be in the right place at the right time to capture that special moment. Professional photo­graphers have a short-hand phrase for this: “F8 and be there.”

There are countless books that can help you with photo­graphic technique, the “F8” portion of that equation. But until now, there’s been little help for the other, more critical portion of that equation, the “be there” part. To find the right spot, you had to expend lots of time and shoe leather to essentially re-invent the wheel.

In my career as a professional travel photo­grapher, well over half my time on location is spent seeking out the good angles. Andrew Hudson’s PhotoSecrets does all that legwork for you, so you can spend your time photo­graphing instead of wandering about. I wish I had one of these books for every city I photo­graph on assignment.

PhotoSecrets can help you capture the most beautiful sights with a minimum of hassle and a maximum of enjoyment. So grab your camera, find your favorite PhotoSecrets spots, and “be there!”

About Bob Krist

Bob Krist has photo­graphed assignments for National Geographic, National Geographic Traveler, Travel/­Holiday, Smithsonian, and Islands. He won “Travel photo­grapher of the Year” from the Society of American Travel Writers in 1994, 2007, and 2008.

For National Geographic, Bob has led round-the-world tours and a traveling lecture series. His book In Tuscany with Frances Mayes spent a month on The New York Times’ bestseller list and his how-to book Spirit of Place was hailed by American Photo­grapher magazine as “the best book about travel photo­graphy we’ve ever read.”

The parents of three sons, Bob and his wife live in New Hope, Pennsylvania.

Welcome

Thank you for reading PhotoSecrets. As a fellow fan of travel and photo­graphy, I hope this guide will help you quickly find the most visually stunning places, and come home with equally stunning photo­graphs.

PhotoSecrets is designed to show you all the best sights. Flick through, see the classic views, and use them as a departure point for your own creations. Flick through, enjoy the photos, and see which places inspire you. Get comp­osition ideas, lighting tips, and a brief history. It’ll be like traveling with a location scout and a pro-photo­grapher by your side.

The idea for PhotoSecrets came during a trip to Thailand, when I tried to find the exotic beach used in the James Bond movie The Man with the Golden Gun. None of the guidebooks I had showed a picture, so I thought a guidebook of postcard photos would be useful for us photographers. If you have any ides for improvements, please send me an email at ahudson@photosecrets.com.

Now, start exploring — and take lots of photos!

About Andrew Hudson

Originally an engineer, Andrew Hudson started PhotoSecrets in 1995. His first book won the Benjamin Franklin Award for Best First Book and his second won the Grand Prize in the National Self-Published Book Awards.

Andrew has published 15 nationally-distributed photo­graphy books. He has photo­graphed assignments for Macy’s, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Men’s Health and Seventeen, and been a location scout for Nikon. His photos and articles have appeared in Alaska Airlines, National Geographic Traveler, Shutterbug Outdoor and Nature photo­graphy, Where, and Woman’s World.

Andrew has a degree in Computer Engineering from Manchester University and a certificate in copyright law from Harvard Law School. Born in Redditch, England, he lives with his wife, two kids, and two chocolate Labs, in San Diego, California.

Introduction

At a Glance

Name:Iceland (Ísland in Icelandic)
GPS:64.133, -21.933
Capital:Reykjavík
Language:Icelandic
Population:332,529 (2016)
Currency:Icelandic króna
Time zone:WET (UTC+0)
Website:>visiticeland.com

Iceland is a Nordic island country in the North Atlantic Ocean. It has a population of 332,529 and an area of 103,000 km (40,000 sq mi), making it the most sparsely populated country in Europe. The capital and largest city is Reykjavík. Reykjavík and the surrounding areas in the southwest of the country are home to over two-thirds of the population. Iceland is volcanically and geologically active. The interior consists of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains and glaciers, while many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic Circle. Its high latitude and marine influence still keeps summers chilly, with most of the archipelago having a tundra climate.

According to the ancient manuscript Landnámabók, the settlement of Iceland began in 874 AD when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent settler on the island. In the following centuries, Norwegians, and to a lesser extent other Scandinavians, emigrated to Iceland, bringing with them thralls of Gaelic origin. The island was governed as an independent commonwealth under the Althing, one of the world’s oldest functioning legislative assemblies. Following a period of civil strife, Iceland acceded to Norwegian rule in the 13th century. The establishment of the Kalmar Union in 1397 united the kingdoms of Norway, Denmark and Sweden. Iceland thus followed Norway’s integration to that Union and came under Danish rule after Sweden’s secession from that union in 1523. Although the Danish kingdom introduced Lutheranism forcefully in 1550, Iceland remained a distant semi-colonial territory in which Danish institutions and infrastructures were conspicuous by their absence. In the wake of the French revolution and the Napoleonic wars, Iceland’s struggle for independence took form and culminated in independence in 1918 and the founding of a republic in 1944. Until the 20th century, Iceland relied largely on subsistence fishing and agriculture, and was among the poorest in Europe. Industrialisation of the fisheries and Marshall Plan aid following World War II brought prosperity, and Iceland became one of the wealthiest and most developed nations in the world. In 1994, it became a part of the European Economic Area, which further diversified the economy into sectors such as finance, biotechnology, and manufacturing.

Iceland has a market economy with relatively low taxes compared to other OECD countries. It maintains a Nordic social welfare system that provides universal health care and tertiary education for its citizens. Iceland ranks high in economic, political and social stability and equality. In 2013, it was ranked as the 13th most-developed country in the world by the United Nations’ Human Development Index. Iceland runs almost completely on renewable energy. Affected by the ongoing worldwide financial crisis, the nation’s entire banking system systemically failed in October 2008, leading to a severe depression, substantial political unrest, the Icesave dispute, and the institution of capital controls. Some bankers were jailed. Since then, the economy has made a significant recovery, in large part due to a surge in tourism.

Icelandic culture is founded upon the nation’s Scandinavian heritage. Most Icelanders are descendants of Germanic and Gaelic settlers., a, is descended from Old Norse and is closely related to and West Norwegian dialects. The country’s cultural heritage includes traditional Icelandic cuisine, Icelandic literature and medieval sagas. Iceland has the smallest population of any NATO member and is the only one with no standing army, with the lightly armed coast guard in charge of defence.

Wikipedia

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Index

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

M

N

O

P

R

S

T

U

V

W

More Info

More information will be available from:

  • App (coming sometime)
  • ebook (coming sometime)
  • Printed book (coming sometime)