PhotoSecrets London

Where to Take Pictures — A Photographer’s Guide to the Best Photography Views, Spots and Locations

Best classic places spots hotspots sites sights views photo locations to photograph for photography with maps tips ideas composition postcard photos cool beautiful pictures

PhotoSecrets

London

Where to Take Pictures

Get 200 Places Now

Photos
Map
Read

Quickly find where to take pictures

  • • Hundreds of inspiring photos
  • • Maps of where to stand and aim
  • • What and when; tips and ideas
  • • Instantly search, filter and sort

1. Big Ben

Big Ben is the icon of London and the subject of every establishing shot of the city. So start your photography adventure with pictures that say “I went to London.”

Officially called Elizabeth Tower (Big Ben is the nickname of the Great Bell inside), the 315-foot-tall (96 m) Gothic Revival tower was completed in 1856. Located in central London by Westminster tube station, Big Ben is best photographed (as above) in the afternoon from Parliament Square Garden on the west side, with golden light.

You can double your impact with a second icon — a double-decker bus. This shot is from Great George Street at Parliament Street. Using a wide-angle lens increase the perspective for even more impact.

Photographing the iconic sights first allows you to get the essential shots in the bag and let you breathe easier for the rest of the trip.

More >

2. Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge is an iconic symbol of London. Named for the nearby Tower of London, it is sometimes incorrectly called London Bridge.

Built between 1886 and 1894, Tower Bridge is recognizable for its two Gothic towers on piers. The two halves of the center roadway fold upwards to allow ships to pass. Scheduled lift times are posted in advance at www.towerbridge.org.uk/lift-times/.

You can photograph Tower Bridge from a multitude of places. The classic view above is from the south, along a pedestrian path accessed by an arched alley called Maggie Black’s Cause. Arrive in the late afternoon to get golden light on the stonework.

More >

3. London Eye

The London Eye opened in 2000 as the world’s tallest Ferris wheel and is the most popular paid tourist attraction in the United Kingdom. The view from 443 feet (135 m) above the Thames includes the Houses of Parliament (above).

More >

4. Tower of London

The Tower of London is where Beefeaters guard the Crown Jewels. The White Tower (above) gives the castle its name and was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 following the Norman Conquest of England. The complex includes two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat.

North of the White Tower is Jewel House which houses the Crown Jewels. This is the best place for close-up photographs of the Queen’s Guard, two of whom stand sentry on the west side of the entrance to Jewel House.

Beefeaters (Yeoman Warders) are retired soldiers and guardians of the Tower of London. Other guards include the famous ravens, at least six of which are kept are kept at the Tower at all times, believing that if they are absent, the kingdom will fall.

More >

5. Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace is the Queen’s London residence and has views from around the entrance. You can photograph the red tunics and black bearskin hats of the Queen’s guard.

More >

6. Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square is a picturesque plaza with two fountains. You can photograph the fountains with a variety of backgrounds, including St Martin-in-the-Fields (above), Nelson’s Column, and the National Gallery.

To get a smooth look to the water (above), use a slow shutter speed, such as 1/8s. You can accomplish this by using a small aperture and, on bright days, a neutral density filter.

The best place to photograph Horatio Nelson atop his column is from the equestrian statue of Charles I, which marks the official center of London. There is a plaque in the pavement to mark the point from which all distances to London are measured.

More >

7. Leadenhall Market

Leadenhall Market is a spectacular covered market, used as Diagon Alley in the Harry Potter films.

Dating from the 14th century, this is one of the oldest markets in London and stands on what was the center of Roman London. Sir Horace Jones designed the ornate Victorian structure in 1881, which has cobbled floors and a color scheme of green, maroon and cream.

These views are all taken with a wide-angle lens from the north entrance at Whittington Avenue.

More >

8. British Museum

The British Museum is one of the world’s largest and most famous museums. Established in 1753, the museum has an impressive entrance (below) along Great Russel Street. Inside, the Great Court (above) is the largest covered square in Europe, with a tessellated glass roof around the original Reading Room (below).

More >

9. Tate Modern

The Tate Modern is the world’s most-visited modern art gallery. The massive Turbine Hall (above) was part of the Bankside Power Station.

On the southwest corner is the ten-story Blavatnik Building, which has a viewing area on the top level.

More >

Welcome

Thank you for reading PhotoSecrets. As a fellow fan of travel and photo­graphy, I hope this guide will help you quickly find the most visually stunning places, and come home with equally stunning photo­graphs.

PhotoSecrets is designed to show you all the best sights. Flick through, see the classic shots, and use them as a departure point for your own creations. Get ideas for comp­osition and interesting viewpoints. See what piques your interest. Know what to shoot, where to stand, when to go, and why it’s interesting. Now you can spend less time researching and more time photographing.

The idea for PhotoSecrets came during a trip to Thailand, when I tried to find the exotic beach used in the James Bond movie The Man with the Golden Gun. None of the guidebooks I had showed a picture, so I thought a guidebook of postcard photos would be useful for us photographers. Twenty-plus years later, you have this guide. Thanks!

Now, start exploring — and take lots of photos!

About Andrew Hudson

Originally an engineer, Andrew Hudson started PhotoSecrets in 1995. His first book won the Benjamin Franklin Award for Best First Book and his second won the Grand Prize in the National Self-Published Book Awards.

Andrew has published 27 nationally-distributed photo­graphy books. He has photo­graphed assignments for Macy’s, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Men’s Health and Seventeen, and been a location scout for Nikon. His photos and articles have appeared in Alaska Airlines, National Geographic Traveler, Shutterbug Outdoor and Nature photo­graphy, Where, and Woman’s World.

Andrew has a degree in Computer Engineering from Manchester University and a certificate in copyright law from Harvard Law School. Born in Redditch, England, he lives with his wife, two kids, and two chocolate Labs, in San Diego, California.

Contents

Foreword

A great travel photo­graph, like a great news photo­graph, requires you to be in the right place at the right time to capture that special moment. Professional photo­graphers have a short-hand phrase for this: “F8 and be there.”

There are countless books that can help you with photo­graphic technique, the “F8” portion of that equation. But until now, there’s been little help for the other, more critical portion of that equation, the “be there” part. To find the right spot, you had to expend lots of time and shoe leather to wander around, track down every potential viewpoint, and essentially re-invent the wheel.

In my career as a professional travel photo­grapher, well over half my time on location is spent seeking out the good angles. Andrew Hudson’s PhotoSecrets does all that legwork for you, so you can spend your time photo­graphing instead of wandering about. It’s like having a professional location scout in your camera bag. I wish I had one of these books for every city I photo­graph on assignment.

PhotoSecrets can help you capture the most beautiful sights with a minimum of hassle and a maximum of enjoyment. So grab your camera, find your favorite PhotoSecrets spots, and “be there!”

About Bob Krist

Bob Krist has photo­graphed assignments for National Geographic, National Geographic Traveler, Travel/­Holiday, Smithsonian, and Islands. He won “Travel photo­grapher of the Year” from the Society of American Travel Writers in 1994, 2007, and 2008.

For National Geographic, Bob has led round-the-world tours and a traveling lecture series. His book In Tuscany with Frances Mayes spent a month on The New York Times’ bestseller list and his how-to book Spirit of Place was hailed by American Photo­grapher magazine as “the best book about travel photo­graphy we’ve ever read.”

The parents of three sons, Bob and his wife live in New Hope, Pennsylvania.

Introduction

London beckons your camera with some of Europe’s most famous sights: Big Ben, the Queen’s Guards and Changing of the Guard, the London Eye, Tower Bridge and the Tower of London.

Located in southeast England on the River Thames, London grew as a port and became the capital and largest city of the United Kingdom.

The Romans founded “Londinium” around AD 43 at a point on the River Thames narrow enough for the construction of a Roman bridge but still deep enough to handle the era’s seagoing ships. The site is close to today’s London Bridge. Seven Roman roads ran to or from the crossing, making the garrison a commercial hub.

After her lands were annexed, Queen Boudica led British Celtic tribes on a revolt that destroyed Londinium around AD 60. But the port was quickly rebuilt as a planned Roman town on the north bank. There was a forum (near today’s St Michael, Cornhill church), baths, an amphitheater and, by 225, a defensive wall. Today, this area is generally the City of London.

The decline and withdrawal of the Roman Empire around 410 saw Londinium abandoned. Activity moved one mile west, around today’s Covent Garden, where another port became the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Lundenwic (“London Port”). The newly Christianized Saxon rulers welcomed Mellitus from Italy around 604 and built the first cathedral. This area is today’s City of Westminster.

When the Vikings started attacking around 830 onwards, Saxon Alfred the Great refortified the Roman walls and the population moved back to Lundenburg (“London Fort”).

Edward the Confessor became king in 1042 and rebuilt the cathedral as the first Westminster Abbey. But he left no heir and his cousin, Duke William of Normandy, claimed the throne. Defeating the Saxons at the Battle of Hastings, William crowned himself King of England in 1066 at Westminster Abbey. He built the Tower of London to subdue Lundenburg, and the Palace of Westminster to become the new political center of England, succeeding the Saxon’s Winchester.

By the late 16th century, London increasingly became a major center for banking, international trade and commerce. The Royal Exchange was founded in 1565 and its location on Threadneedle Street is the center of the City’s financial district.

In 1666, the Great Fire of London burned for four days and destroyed ¾ of the City within the walls. St Paul’s Cathedral was rebuilt by Christopher Wren and remained the tallest building in London until 1967. Today, the tallest building is The Shard, completed in 2012 at 1,017 feet (310 m).

The 18th century was a period of rapid growth for London, reflecting an increasing national population, the early stirrings of the Industrial Revolution, and London’s control of the evolving British Empire. The urban area expanded beyond the borders of the City of London, most notably during this period towards the West End and Westminster.

Today, over 19 million people visit London, many of them with a camera.

Big Ben

London > City of Westminster > Westminster > Palace of Westminster

Big Ben is the icon of London and the subject of every establishing shot of the city. So start your photography adventure with pictures that say “I went to London.”

Officially called Elizabeth Tower (Big Ben is the nickname of the Great Bell inside), the 315-foot-tall (96 m) Gothic Revival tower was completed in 1856. Located in central London by Westminster tube station, Big Ben is best photographed (as above) in the afternoon from Parliament Square Garden on the west side, with golden light.

You can double your impact with a second icon — a double-decker bus. This shot is from Great George Street at Parliament Street. Using a wide-angle lens increase the perspective for even more impact.

Photographing the iconic sights first allows you to get the essential shots in the bag and let you breathe easier for the rest of the trip.

Addr:Palace of Westminster,
London SW1A 0AA
Where:51.5008319
-0.1271486
What:TowerWhen:Afternoon
Look:East →Wikipedia link

Above: To the west on Great George Street are several red telephone boxes (this is the east one). Note how a slight angle gives the image some dynamic. Below: A pair of boxes to the north on Victoria Embankment await your camera.

Above: This horse is part of the Boudiccan Rebellion sculpture to the northeast.

Below: This tube sign is outside Portcullis House, across the street to the north.

Palace of Westminster

London > City of Westminster > Westminster

The Palace of Westminster includes Big Ben and is known as the Houses of Parliament for its occupants. Replacing a royal palace from 1016 used by the Parliament of England since the 13th century, the current Gothic Revival palace is, for ceremonial purposes, officially a royal residence.

These views are from: Parliament Square Garden (above, west) with a statue of David Lloyd George; Abingdon Street by Old Palace Yard (left, SW); and Victoria Tower Gardens (right, south) with the Buxton Fountain.

Addr:Westminster,
London SW1A 0AA
Where:51.500846
-0.126759
What:CapitolWhen:Afternoon
Look:East →Wikipedia link

Westminster Bridge

London > City of Westminster > Westminster

Westminster Bridge and the South Bank provide the classic photos of the Palace of Westminster. Extending east from Big Ben, the bridge is best photographed in the morning (for sunlight from the east) and at dusk. You can include passing buses as a foreground and contrasting color.

For a shot with tail lights, be on the bridge shortly after sunset, as the light falls during dusk. You’ll need a tripod or other steady support to avoid camera blur during the long exposure.

Addr:Westminster Bridge,
London SW1A 2JH
Where:51.500881
-0.12041
What:BridgeWhen:Morning
Look:West ←Wikipedia link

A beautiful arch on the southeast side of the bridge makes a valuable framing device.

These classic views are from the South Bank (east side), along The Queen’s Walk (above:north; below:south).

Buckingham Palace and Victoria Memorial

Buckingham Palace is the Queen’s London residence and often hosts state occasions and royal hospitality. Dating from 1703 as a townhouse for the Duke of Buckingham, the palace has been enlarged in a French neo-classical style. The principal façade was completed in 1850 by Edward Blore, and redesigned in 1913 by Sir Aston Webb, who also contributed the Victoria Memorial (above).

Located ¾ mile (1.2 km) west of Big Ben, Buckingham Palace is best photographed from the northeast, using as a foreground the flower beds by Green Park (above). Travel photography often has hard, man-made subjects far away, so always look for soft, natural foregrounds to add depth, dimension and color to your shots.

A similar flower bed is on the west side of St James’s Park.

Addr:Buckingham Palace,
London SW1A 1AA
Where:51.502657
-0.140019
When:MorningLook:Southwest ↙
Wikipedia linkFar:200 m (650 feet)

Above: Buckingham Palace and Victoria Memorial from the flower beds in St James’s Park. Below: Buckingham Palace became the London residence of the British monarch on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837.

Above: St James’s Park Lake and trees give this view a soft, romantic frame.
Below: The Mall is the ceremonial approach.

Changing of the Guard

Changing of the Guard is a major ceremony and a perfect time to capture colorful photos of people. This free show features the iconic black bearskin hats and red tunics of The Queen’s Guard and occurs once a day in the summer, and every other day otherwise (but not in wet weather or during large events).

The parade starts at 10:45am and is very popular, so arrive well beforehand to claim your preferred spot. I like the west side of the Victoria Memorial, with Buckingham Palace in the background.

At any time, you can photograph a guard outside the east gate. Unfortunately you can’t get a close-up view as the as you’ll be 124 feet (38 m) away, at the fence by the Victoria Memorial. So use a long lens and rest against the ironwork for a steady picture.

Addr:Buckingham Palace,
London SW1A 1AA
Where:51.50156
-0.141232
What:GroupWhen:Morning
Look:Southwest ↙Wikipedia link

The Coldstream Guards provide musical support during Changing of the Guard.

The Victoria Memorial, named for the first monarch to reside here.

Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey has hosted the coronation of every crowned English and British monarch since William the Conqueror in 1016. You may recognize it from the wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton in 2011.

A church has existed on the site since the seventh century and the present structure dates from 1245. The mainly Gothic church (which is no longer an abbey) is located next to the Palace of Westminster. There are two sides to photograph: the main entrance on the west side (above) and the north entrance with flying buttresses and a rose window.

These photos show different ways to indicate depth in your photos. Above, a steep angle emphasizes perspective, and right, the pathway adds leading lines and tree leaves help make a frame.

Addr:20 Dean’s Yard,
London SW1P 3PA
Where:51.499481
-0.128617
What:AbbeyWhen:Afternoon
Look:East →Wikipedia link

Above: The nave has an intricately ribbed vaulted ceiling.

Below: The galleries surround a courtyard.

Horse Guards

Horse Guards offers you photos of horse-mounted guards in red regalia. You can get surprisingly close to the stoic guards, but don’t as horses can kick or bite.

On the west side is Horse Guards Parade, a large parade ground home to the annual Trooping of the Colour ceremony. At 4pm daily, you can photograph the guards and horses on the parade ground, after visiting the Household Cavalry Museum. Queen Victoria started the routine in 1894 when she caught guards drinking and gambling in the afternoon and punished them with a four o’clock inspection — for 100 years.

As with people, animals are best photographed at or below eye level. This is easy to accomplish with a tall horse.

Addr:66 Whitehall,
London SW1A 2AX
Where:51.5047005
-0.1278337
What:BuildingWhen:Afternoon
Look:East-northeast Wikipedia link

Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square is a picturesque plaza with two fountains. You can photograph the fountains with a variety of backgrounds, including St Martin-in-the-Fields (above), Nelson’s Column, and the National Gallery.

To get a smooth look to the water (above), use a slow shutter speed, such as 1/8s. You can accomplish this by using a small aperture and, on bright days, a neutral density filter.

The best place to photograph Horatio Nelson atop his column is from the equestrian statue of Charles I, which marks the official center of London. There is a plaque in the pavement to mark the point from which all distances to London are measured.

Addr:Trafalgar Square,
London WC2N 5DN
Where:51.508008
-0.127853
What:SquareWhen:Afternoon
Look:Northeast ↗Wikipedia link

Below: One of Nelson’s bronze lions with Big Ben.

Below: Shooting into the sun provides backlighting to the water.

Covent Garden

Covent Garden is a lively tourist area with street performers and cafes in and around a former fruit-and-vegetable market.

From at least 1200, the area was a walled garden owned by Westminster Abbey’s monks, known by the Anglo-French term “covent” (for monastery or convent). Houses were added in 1630 around an Italian-style arcaded square, which became home to a fruit-and-vegetable market. In 1830, Charles Fowler added the neo-classical market building, with sunken courtyards and three vaulted glass roofs.Covent Garden is an excellent place to photograph people and details, to add life to your visual story.

Addr:The Market Bldg,
London WC2E 8RF
Where:51.511689
-0.122998
What:BuildingWhen:Indoors
Look:East-northeast Wikipedia link

Neal’s Yard

Neal’s Yard is a colorful courtyard in the Covent Garden district. This is a real “secret” location which you could easily walk past without noticing, since it can’t be seen from the main streets.

Neal’s Yard is accessed by two nondescript alleys, off Monmouth Street and Shorts Gardens, near Neal Street. A wide-angle lens will help in the tight space.

Addr:Neal’s Yard,
London WC2H 9DP
Where:51.514401
-0.126351
What:CourtyardWhen:Morning
Look:North-northwest Wikipedia link

Young Dancer

The Royal Opera House in Covent Garden has a neo-classical façade dating from 1858. The Royal Ballet also resides here and outside the Bow Street entrance is a suitable foreground.

Young Dancer is a ballerina statue by Enzo Plazzotta in 1988, and a gift from his estate. Behind her, on Broad Court, is a row of five red telephone boxes, so you have several photographic elements to toy with.

Addr:5 Broad Ct,
London WC2B 5QH
Where:51.513629
-0.122378
What:StatueWhen:Afternoon
Look:South ↓Far:40 m (130 feet)

The Old Curiosity Shop

The Old Curiosity Shop is a 16th century building thought to be the inspiration for Dickens’s novel. The building dates back to the sixteenth century and was built using timber from old ships. At one time it functioned as a dairy on an estate given by King Charles II to one of his many mistresses.

The name was added after release of the serialized novel, which was so popular that New York readers stormed the wharf when the ship bearing the final installment arrived in 1841.

The Old Curiosity Shop is tucked away amongst the buildings of the London School of Economics.

Addr:13–14 Portsmouth Street,
London WC2A 2ES
Where:51.514848
-0.117359
What:ShopWhen:Afternoon
Look:North ↑Wikipedia link

Chinatown

Chinatown has a colorful gate in the style of the Qing dynasty. , Built in 2016, the Chinatown gate is on Wardour Street, off Shaftesbury Avenue.

On the adjoining Gerrard Street at Macclesfield Street are a pair of Chinese lions and the decorative Lotus Garden restaurant (below).

Addr:10 Wardour St,
London W1D 6BZ
Where:51.510866
-0.131758
What:DistrictWhen:Morning
Look:Northwest ↖Wikipedia link

Liberty

Liberty is an historic department store with a spectacular Tudor revival building. Built from the timbers of two ships, HMS Impregnable and HMS Hindustan, there are overhanging bays and a carriage arch. Inside are three light wells, and many of the rooms had fireplaces, some of which still exist.

Arthur Lasenby Liberty opened a fabric and arts store in 1875 and built this black-and-white marvel in 1924. Liberty is located in the West End on Great Marlborough Street, off Regent Street.

Addr:Regent St,
London W1B 5AH
Where:51.513849
-0.140824
What:Department storeWhen:Afternoon
Look:East-southeast Wikipedia link

Piccadilly Circus

Piccadilly Circus is the Times Square of London known for its large neon signs. The busy junction was originally a traffic circle (roundabout), which is known in Latin as a circus.

The area was redesigned in the 1980s so that the circle’s famous center, the Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain, was moved and is now a pedestrian area.

Atop the 1893 fountain is a statue commonly known as Eros, but actually of his brother, the Greek god Anteros.

Addr:Piccadilly Circus,
London W1J 9HS
Where:51.509868
-0.134186
What:IntersectionWhen:Morning
Look:West ←Wikipedia link

Sherlock Holmes Museum

The Sherlock Holmes Museum is dedicated to the famous fictional detective. Given the famous address of 221B Baker Street, the 1815 town house was a boarding school during 1881 to 1904 when Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson were described in the stories as residing as tenants of Mrs Hudson.

The rooms are dressed in character so that imagining Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s hero living here is, well, elementary.

Addr:221B Baker St,
London NW1 6XE
Where:51.523775
-0.158358
What:MuseumWhen:Morning
Look:Southwest ↙Wikipedia link

Sherlock Holmes

Sherlock Holmes portrays the famous detective as a statue by John Doubleday. Unveiled in 1999, the statue was funded by the Abbey National building society, whose head office occupied the 215–229 block of Baker Street that would include number 221b.

Holmes stands outside Baker Street tube station, one of the original stations of the world’s first underground railway, opened in 1863.

Addr:4 Marylebone Rd,
London NW1 5LD
Where:51.522513
-0.156595
What:StatueWhen:Afternoon
Look:South-southeast Far:4 m (13 feet)

Abbey Road Zebra Crossing

Abbey Road has the world’s most famous “zebra crossing”, where The Beatles were pictured on their last recorded album, “Abbey Road.” You can make a fun selfie here, particularly if your group is a Fab Four, as you stride over the white-striped pedestrian crossing.

The original image was taken on 8 August 1969 outside EMI Studios at 3 Abbey Road. Photographer Iain Macmillan stood on a step-ladder while a policeman held up traffic behind the camera. The image has become one of the most famous and imitated in recording history.

Addr:3 Abbey Road,
London NW8 9AY
Where:51.531995
-0.177251
What:Zebra crossingWhen:Morning
Look:Northwest ↖Wikipedia link

Little Venice

Little Venice is a scenic district around the junction of the Grand Union Canal, which opened in 1801, and Regent’s Canal, opened in 1816. A bridge at Warwick Avenue affords a view up the waterway. The towpath by Waterside Cafe has a view of the junction and Robert Browning’s Island (below-left).

Addr:6 Warwick Ave,
London W2 1XB
Where:51.521978
-0.181673
What:DistrictWhen:Afternoon
Look:Northeast ↗Wikipedia link

Paddington Basin

Paddington Basin is a redeveloped canal basin, southeast of Little Venice, with two unique movable footbridges. Thomas Heatherwick’s Rolling Bridge (2004) uses eight eight triangular section and hydraulics to curl up into an octagon. There are scheduled lift times at Wednesdays and Fridays at noon, and Saturdays at 2pm.

Nearby (650 feet / 200 m east), is the Merchant Square Footbridge, also known as Fan Bridge, which rotates up in five sections at different angles, like a Japanese fan.

Addr:S Wharf Rd,
London W2 1NW
Where:51.518449
-0.174623
What:DistrictWhen:Afternoon
Look:South-southeast Wikipedia link

Dome

Addr:Where:51.490911
-0.127180
What:DomeWhen:Indoors
Look:Up ↑Far:0 m (0 feet)

Entrance

Addr:Where:51.4906681
-0.1266057
When:MorningLook:West-northwest
Far:30 m (100 feet)

Stairs

Addr:Where:51.491609
-0.126639
What:StairsWhen:Indoors
Look:West ←Far:0 m (0 feet)

British Museum

The British Museum is one of the world’s largest and most famous museums. Established in 1753, the museum has an impressive entrance (below) along Great Russel Street. Inside, the Great Court (above) is the largest covered square in Europe, with a tessellated glass roof around the original Reading Room (below).

Addr:Great Russell St,
London WC1B 3DG
Where:51.5190537
-0.1266025
What:MuseumWhen:Morning
Look:North-northwest Wikipedia link

Cecil Brewer Spiral Staircase

Cecil Brewer Spiral Staircase is billed as London’s most photographed staircase. Located inside Heal’s Furniture Store on Tottenham Court Road, the graceful 1916 design is by Ambrose Heal’s cousin, the architect by Cecil Brewer. A Bocci chandelier added in 2013 provides a sparkling center to shots from above or below (pictured above).

Addr:196 Tottenham Court Rd,
London W1T 7LQ
Where:51.521316
-0.134172
What:StaircaseWhen:Indoors
Look:Up ↑Wikipedia link

London King’s Cross railway station

London King’s Cross is a major London railway terminus, particularly for journeys to Hogwarts. Opened in 1852, this is where the fictional wizard and his friends dashed through a brick wall to catch the Hogwarts Express.

You can take a magical selfie at a picture area in the station concourse. Oddly enough, this is located next to the Harry Potter shop.

Addr:Euston Rd,
London N1 9AL
Where:51.532143
-0.123969
What:Railway stationWhen:Indoors
Look:Southeast ↘Wikipedia link

Isaac Newton

Newton, after William Blake, is a large bronze heroic representation of Sir Isaac Newton, one of the most influential scientists of all time. Designed by Eduardo Paolozzi in 1995, the sculpture is based on William Blake’s study that pictured the flexible Newton drawing with a compass.

The sculpture is located in the piazza of the British Library, along Euston Road. While you’re there, check out the tower of King’s Library, behind smoked glass.

Addr:96 Euston Rd,
London NW1 2DB
Where:51.5289958
-0.1274612
What:StatueWhen:Morning
Look:West-northwest Wikipedia link

St Pancras International

St Pancras International is a glorious Victorian edifice. The frontispiece (above) is a hotel opened in 1873 with a grand staircase. The arched entrance leads to a 30-foot (9 m) high sculpture called The Meeting Place (2007, Paul Day) and Sir John Betjeman (2007, Martin Jenning).

Addr:Euston Rd,
London N1C 4QP
Where:51.529315
-0.125871
What:Railway stationWhen:Morning
Look:North ↑Wikipedia link

Tower of London

The Tower of London is where Beefeaters guard the Crown Jewels. The White Tower (above) gives the castle its name and was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 following the Norman Conquest of England. The complex includes two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat.

North of the White Tower is Jewel House which houses the Crown Jewels. This is the best place for close-up photographs of the Queen’s Guard, two of whom stand sentry on the west side of the entrance to Jewel House.

Beefeaters (Yeoman Warders) are retired soldiers and guardians of the Tower of London. Other guards include the famous ravens, at least six of which are kept are kept at the Tower at all times, believing that if they are absent, the kingdom will fall.

Addr:St Katharine’s and Wapping,
London EC3N 4AB
Where:51.507724
-0.076829
What:TowerWhen:Afternoon
Look:East-northeast Wikipedia link

Above: The White Tower and Traitors’ Gate (the lower arch) as viewed across the Thames by London City Hall.
Below: Beefeaters and a raven.

Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge is an iconic symbol of London. Named for the nearby Tower of London, it is sometimes incorrectly called London Bridge.

Built between 1886 and 1894, Tower Bridge is recognizable for its two Gothic towers on piers. The two halves of the center roadway fold upwards to allow ships to pass. Scheduled lift times are posted in advance at www.towerbridge.org.uk/lift-times/.

You can photograph Tower Bridge from a multitude of places. The classic view above is from the south, along a pedestrian path accessed by an arched alley called Maggie Black’s Cause. Arrive in the late afternoon to get golden light on the stonework.

Addr:Tower Bridge Rd,
London SE1 2UP
Where:51.504068
-0.07478
What:BridgeWhen:Morning
Look:North-northwest Wikipedia link

Above: From Tower Wharf by the Tower of London, at sunrise.

Below: With “Girl with a Dolphin” at St Katharine Docks.

You can walk across the bridge for free (above) and, for a fee, enter Tower Bridge Exhibition to see the original steam engines (below). You can also cross the high-level walkways that now have glass floors.

Trinity Buoy Wharf

Trinity Buoy Wharf is an arts and culture area on the River Thames, about 4.5 miles (7.3 km) east of the City of London.

In the center is Container City 2 (above), a 2002 studio and office complex made from 22 recycled sea shipping containers in a colorful ziggurat. Docked at the wharf is the bright red Light Vessel 93, built in Devon in 1938 and used as a photographic studio and location.

Overlooking the Thames is London’s only lighthouse. Trinity Buoy Wharf Light, also known as Bow Creek Lighthouse, was built in 1864–66 by James Douglass and was used to test lighting systems for other lighthouses. Michael Faraday carried out experiments here.

Addr:64 Orchard Pl,
London E14 0JW
Where:51.508026
0.008560
What:WharfWhen:Morning
Look:West-northwest Wikipedia link

Above: Taxis are no longer invited to park by Lightship LV93.
Below: London’s only lighthouse.

Natural History Museum

The Natural History Museum has an ornate Romanesque terracotta facade on Cromwell Road (below and later). Inside, the main Hintze Hall (above) has skylights, an imperial staircase, and large niches for exhibits.

Addr:Cromwell Rd,
London SW7 5BD
Where:51.496031
-0.176372
What:MuseumWhen:Morning
Look:North ↑Wikipedia link

Above: Late afternoon light, viewed from east of the entrance.

Below: A blue whale skeleton hangs in Hintze Hall.

Royal Albert Hall

The Royal Albert Hall is best known for holding the annual summer Proms concerts since 1941. You can photograph the 1871 main entrance (above) on the south side from Prince Consort Road, and the north entrance from Kensington Gardens. Paid tours include the auditorium.

Addr:Kensington Gore,
London SW7 2AP
Where:51.499919
-0.177192
What:HallWhen:Morning
Look:North ↑Wikipedia link

National Art Library

The National Art Library is a major reference library, open free to the public (Tue–Sat). The library is on the first floor of the Victoria and Albert Museum, the world’s largest museum of applied and decorative arts and design.

Addr:2 Cromwell Rd,
London SW7 4EF
Where:51.4968
-0.17262
What:LibraryWhen:Indoors
Look:East →Wikipedia link

Kynance Mews

Kynance Mews is a popular Instagram spot. Grand arches lead to a cobblestone road lined with quaint servants’ quarters built over stables and carriage houses.

Addr:Kensington,
London SW7 4QS
Where:51.4974864
-0.1837557
What:StreetWhen:Morning
Look:West-southwest Wikipedia link

Queen Victoria

Queen Victoria is an 1893 statue near Kensington Palace. This view is from the west side of Kensington Gardens and puts the sun behindHer Majesty as a backlight.

Addr:Kensington Gardens,
London W8 4PX
Where:51.505405
-0.185834
What:StatueWhen:Morning
Look:West-southwest Wikipedia link

Lady Justice

Lady Justice finds the iconic legal figure atop the Old Bailey courthouse. Designed by British sculptor F. W. Pomeroy, she holds aloft a pair of scales and a sword, symbolizing her fairness and authority.

Below her, the Central Criminal Court deals with major criminal cases from within Greater London and in exceptional cases from England and Wales.

This view is from Bishop’s Court.

Addr:The Old Bailey,
London EC4M 7EH
Where:51.516077
-0.102267
What:SculptureWhen:Afternoon
Look:Southeast ↘Wikipedia link

Mizuho House

Mizuho House is a wave-like building with multi-coloured window louvres that look like books in a giant library. Located near the Old Bailey and officially called 2 New Ludgate, the 2015 building is leased to Mizuho Bank.

Addr:30 Old Bailey,
London EC4M 7AU
Where:51.5157555
-0.1020976
What:BuildingWhen:Morning
Look:South-southwest Wikipedia link

St Paul’s Cathedral

St Paul’s Cathedral is the masterpiece of Britain’s most famous architect, Sir Christopher Wren. Built in 1675 after the Great Fire of London, the dome was the tallest building in London until 1967.

Since 604, there has been a church at this site, the highest point of the City of London. Today, you can photograph from all around the cathedral, with the best views from the southeast corner, along St. Paul’s Churchyard (above) and Festival Gardens. After capturing shots of the grand central dome, you can climb steps to galleries above the dome. The Golden Gallery, just below the cross on the top, offers panoramic views of the London skyline.

Addr:St. Paul’s Churchyard,
London EC4M 8AD
Where:51.513026
-0.09737
What:CathedralWhen:Dusk
Look:Northwest ↖Wikipedia link

The magnificent Baroque dome in the center of the cathedral. A wide-angle lens helps here.

Below: The London skyline from the Golden Gallery, 528 steps high.

Below: One New Change. Right: Stairs to the galleries.

Leadenhall Market

Leadenhall Market is a spectacular covered market, used as Diagon Alley in the Harry Potter films.

Dating from the 14th century, this is one of the oldest markets in London and stands on what was the center of Roman London. Sir Horace Jones designed the ornate Victorian structure in 1881, which has cobbled floors and a color scheme of green, maroon and cream.

These views are all taken with a wide-angle lens from the north entrance at Whittington Avenue.

Addr:Gracechurch St,
London EC3V 1LR
Where:51.512752
-0.083473
What:MarketWhen:Indoors
Look:South-southwest Wikipedia link

Lloyd’s Building

The Lloyd’s Building is known as the “Inside-Out Building” since services such as ducts and lifts are on the exterior to maximize the interior space. Built 1978–1986 on Lime Street, the building is best photographed from Leadenhall Street, by the northeast stairwell tower, toward 30 St Mary Axe.

Unfortunately there are no public tours of the interior.

Addr:One Lime Street,
London EC3M 7HA
Where:51.51363
-0.081515
What:BuildingWhen:Morning
Look:Southwest ↙Wikipedia link

30 St Mary Axe

30 St Mary Axe is known as “The Gherkin” for its unusual bulging shape. One of the city’s most widely recognized examples of modern architecture, the 2001 skyscraper was designed by Norman Foster and Arup Group.

This view is from Leadenhall Street, by the Lloyd’s building. In the foreground is St Andrew Undershaft, a rare example of a City church that survived both the Great Fire of London and the Blitz.

Addr:30 St Mary Axe,
London EC3A 8EP
Where:51.513446
-0.081877
What:BuildingWhen:Afternoon
Look:Northeast ↗Wikipedia link

Sky Garden

Sky Garden is London’s highest public garden. Occupying the three-floor section at the top of the 20 Fenchurch Street “Walkie-Talkie” skyscraper, has views of ferns and skylines.

Obligated to be public, free access is limited to time-slots booked three days in advance.

Addr:20 Fenchurch St,
London EC3M 8AF
Where:51.511042
-0.083362
What:GardenWhen:Indoors
Look:West ←Wikipedia link

London Eye

The London Eye opened in 2000 as the world’s tallest Ferris wheel and is the most popular paid tourist attraction in the United Kingdom. The view from 443 feet (135 m) above the Thames includes the Houses of Parliament (above).

Addr:South Bank,
London SE1 7PB
Where:51.503408
-0.119637
What:Ferris wheelWhen:Morning
Look:South-southwest Wikipedia link

Above: The Eye moves slow enough for you to take many bird’s eye photos.

Below: An avenue of trees leading to the entrance from Belvedere Road.

Tate Modern

The Tate Modern is the world’s most-visited modern art gallery. The massive Turbine Hall (above) was part of the Bankside Power Station.

On the southwest corner is the ten-story Blavatnik Building, which has a viewing area on the top level.

Addr:Bankside,
London SE1 9TG
Where:51.507537
-0.099016
What:MuseumWhen:Indoors
Look:West ←Wikipedia link

Millennium Bridge

Millennium Bridge is a steel suspension footbridge aligned for a clear view of St. Paul’s Cathedral. The suspension cables are to the sides of the bridge, rather than overhead, producing a wide and low profile.

The bridge is best photographed from the South Bank by the Tate Modern, to include St. Paul’s in the background.

Addr:Thames Embankment,
London SE1 9JE
Where:51.508382
-0.09922
What:BridgeWhen:Afternoon
Look:North-northeast Wikipedia link

Shakespeare’s Globe

Shakespeare’s Globe is a reconstruction of the Bard’s theater-in-the-round, originally built in 1599. The Globe is located by the Tate Modern, and this view is from Queen’s Walk along the Thames. A paid guided tour takes you to the balconies and backstage.

Addr:21 New Globe Walk,
London SE1 9DT
Where:51.50838
-0.096782
What:TheaterWhen:Morning
Look:Southwest ↙Wikipedia link

Golden Hinde

The Golden Hinde is a replica of the first ship to circumnavigate of the globe. Built with traditional methods in Devon and launched in 1973, the full-size reconstruction is seaworthy and has herself circumnavigated the globe. Open to the public, she resides next to Old Thameside Inn at Bankside.

The original Golden Hind was named and captained by Sir Francis Drake on her three-year journey (1577–1580). Raiding a Spanish galleon en route, the ship returned to Plymouth with enough treasure to pay off the entire government debt, twice over.

Addr:St Mary Overie’s Dock,
London SE1 9DE
Where:51.50709
-0.090315
What:ShipWhen:Afternoon
Look:South ↓Wikipedia link

The Shard

The Shard dominates the London skyline and is Europe’s tallest building. Standing 1,016 feet (310 m) high, the 2012 skyscraper was designed by Renzo Piano. There is an observation deck [paid admission] called The View (below).

Addr:32 London Bridge St,
London SE1 9SG
Where:51.504068
-0.08652
What:BuildingWhen:Morning
Look:North-northwest Wikipedia link

London City Hall

London City Hall is housed in a 2002 slanted orb by Norman Foster. A helical walkway ascends the full ten stories and leads to an open viewing deck which is occasionally open to the public.

Addr:The Queen’s Walk,
London SE1 2AA
Where:51.505033
-0.079576
What:CityWhen:Afternoon
Look:East-southeast Wikipedia link

Above: The Queen’s Walk is a wide pedestrian path along the Thames.
Below: The view from Tower Bridge at sunset includes London City Hall and The Shard.

Tulip Stairs

The Tulip Stairs at the Queen’s House provide a beautiful abstract photograph around a lantern (skylight). Built 1616–1635 with cantilever support from the walls, these were the first helical stairs in England without a central support.

The Tulip Stairs are in the Queen’s House, a former royal residence in Greenwich and the first consciously classical building in the country. Architect Inigo Jones had just returned from a grand tour of Roman, Renaissance, and Palladian architecture in Italy and used his inspiration to great effect. The inspiration for classical English and American Palladianism can be traced to this building.

Spiral staircases make great photography subjects as they are full of leading lines provide motion for the eye and show depth.

Addr:Queen’s House,
London SE10 9NF
Where:51.481258
-0.0036621
What:Helical stairsWhen:Indoors
Look:Up ↑Wikipedia link

Royal Observatory Greenwich

The Royal Observatory, Greenwich played a major role in global navigation and is the historical home of the prime meridian (0° longitude). Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is measured from here, as the average (mean) moment the sun crosses the observatory and reaches its highest point in the sky.

Built in 1676, the Royal Observatory was commissioned by King Charles II to “…to find out the so much desired longitude of places for the perfecting of the art of navigation.” The 20 foot high Octagon Room (above) housed two clocks with 13 foot (4 m) long pendulums above the clock face — the most accurate of the day.

A red time ball was added in 1833 to help mariners at the port to synchronize their clocks to GMT. Every day, as a time signal, the ball is dropped at 1pm.

Addr:Blackheath Ave,
London SE10 8XJ
Where:51.477947
-0.001542
What:ObservatoryWhen:Afternoon
Look:South-southeast Wikipedia link

Above: Standing over the original prime meridian.
Below: The Dolphin Sundial (1978 by Christopher Daniel and Edwin Russell) tells the time using the gap between the two tails as the gnomon (pointer).

Old Royal Naval College

Old Royal Naval College is Sir Christopher Wren’s twin-domed riverside masterpiece. Built 1696–1712 as a naval hospital, the symmetrical complex has an avenue in the center due to a requirement of Mary II: that the Queen’s House to the southeast retained a view of the Thames.

Addr:King William Walk,
London SE10 9NN
Where:51.4837692
-0.0059873
What:CollegeWhen:Afternoon
Look:South-southeast Wikipedia link

The Painted Hall (above) was painted between 1707 and 1726 by Sir James Thornhill. Its entrance hall (vestibule, below) is beneath the west dome.

Cutty Sark

Cutty Sark is one of the fastest — and last — tea clipper ships. Built in 1869, she sailed eight times from China to England, with a fastest time of 107 days. She is on display in Greenwich at a dry dock, where a glass-roofed building (fee required) allows you to walk under and around her keel.

This high impact perspective is courtesy of a wide-angle lens. My favorite length is a 28mm lens (or the equivalent on a non-35mm camera). To get both the foreground and background in focus (called a “wide depth-of-field”) you’ll need a small aperture (with a big “f” number, such as f/22).

Addr:King William Walk,
London SE10 9HT
Where:51.483295
-0.009557
What:ShipWhen:Morning
Look:South ↓Wikipedia link

Battersea Power Station

Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames. This view is from the north end of Chelsea Bridge. A similar view (but from the southeast) was famously used on the cover of Pink Floyd’s 1977 album, Animals, along with, of course, a floating pink pig.

Addr:Battersea Power Station,
London SW8
Where:51.485477
-0.149831
What:BuildingWhen:Afternoon
Look:Southeast ↘Wikipedia link

Out of Order

Out of Order is an unusual sculpture of a dozen telephone boxes falling like dominoes. Created by Scottish sculptor and installation artist David Mach in 1988, the artwork lies by the Wilko store in Kingston upon Thames, 10 miles (16 km) southwest of Big Ben.

Addr:29a Old London Rd,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 1QT
Where:51.410839
-0.300603
What:SculptureWhen:Afternoon
Look:East-southeast Far:11 m (36 feet)

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park is the site of the 2012 Olympic Games and includes three photogenic elements from the event.

The Olympic Rings (above) are located on a small hill along the main approach pedestrian path. This view from the south side includes the Velodrome in the background.

ArcelorMittal Orbit is Britain’s largest piece of public art. The Olympic tower is a sculpture and observation tower, 376 feet (114 m) tall. Funded mainly by steel tycoon Lakshmi Mittal of ArcelorMittal, the Orbit was designed by Sir Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond.

Addr:Olympic Park,
London E15 2GY
Where:51.548812
-0.01663
What:ParkWhen:Afternoon
Look:North-northeast Wikipedia link

The ArcelorMittal Orbit (above) and Velodrome (below).

Hampton Court Palace

Hampton Court Palace is Henry VIII’s 16th century masterpiece, his favorite palace and residence to many of his queens. Cardinal Thomas Wolsey commenced construction in 1515, but, to reduce his fall from favor, gifted the palace to the King in 1529.

The Great Gatehouse (above) combines perpendicular Gothic-inspired Tudor with restrained Renaissance ornament. The bridge over the moat features heraldic animals, called the King’s Beasts.

Hampton Court Palace is located 12 miles (19 km) southwest of central London in Richmond upon Thames, easily reached by train from Waterloo station. Paid admission.

Addr:Molesey,
East Molesey KT8 9AU
Where:51.403576
-0.339739
What:Former royal palaceWhen:Afternoon
Look:East →Wikipedia link

Above: A royal lion in the Chapel Court Garden.

Below: Christopher Wren’s south front and the Privy Garden.

Above: A sunken garden and the Banqueting House. Below: The Chapel.

Below: Anne Boleyn’s Gate viewed from the Great Gatehouse.

Kew Gardens

Kew Gardens is a famous botanic garden with the largest and most diverse botanical and mycological collections in the world. Created in 1759 and officially known as Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, the 300 acre (121 hectares) site is in Richmond, 5.6 miles (9 km) northeast of Hampton Court Palace.

The Palm House (above) was built 1844–48 with a space frame of wrought iron arches and glass panels. On the east side are the Queen’s Beasts (ten statues of animals bearing shields) and a formal garden (pareterre).

Another photogenic wonder is The Hive (2015, Wolfgang Buttress). A 56-foot (17 m) tall enclosure provides an immersive experience with lights and sound inspired by bees.

Addr:Kew Rd,
Richmond TW9 3AB
Where:51.478633
-0.291757
What:GardensWhen:Morning
Look:Northwest ↖Wikipedia link

Above: A Queen’s Beast. Below: The Sackler Crossing.

Above: Looking up from inside The Hive. Below: Museum No. 1 and the Pond.

Above: The Marianne North Gallery. Below: The Queen’s Garden.

Below: The Great Pagoda by the Japanese Landscape.

Credits

Thank you to the many wonderful people and companies that made their work available to use in this guide.

Photo key: Tap the camera icon to see the photo. The letters reference the position on the page, the distributor and the license. Key: a:CC-BY-SA; b:bottom; c:center; f:Flickr; h:Shutterstock standard license; l:public domain; o:CC0; q:Pixabay; s:Shutterstock; t:top; w:Wikipedia; y:CC-BY.

Cover image by Double Bind/Shutterstock.Other images by: A.canvas.of.light; Alice-photo; Amadeustx; Andersphoto; Androniques; Leonid Andronov; Ansharphoto; Anton_ivanov; Anyaivanova; Doug Armand; Asiastock; Aslysun; Tony Baggett; Baloncici; Willy Barton; Bba Photography; Bcfc; Photocreo Michal Bednarek; Bikeworldtravel; Double Bind; Justin Black; Stephen Boisvert; S Borisov; Chrisdorney; Christo Mitkov Christov; Colin; Cowardlion; Philip Bird Lrps Cpagb; Daliu; Diego Delso; Songquan Deng; Diliff; Angelina Dimitrova; Claudio Divizia; Dreamcatcherdiana; Elenachaykinaphotography; Elena Elisseeva; Ron Ellis; Elroce; Eqroy; Martin Alvarez Espinar; Exflow; F11photo; Alexey Fedorenko; Fenlioq; Angelo Ferraris; Fiatlux; Eg Focus; Prochasson Frederic; Giovanni G; Gagliardiphotography; Lois Gobe; Illusions Of Grandeur; Grzegorz_pakula; Sven Hansche; I Wei Huang; Alex Hubenov; Bill Hunt; Victor Iemma; Ilongloveking; Jpitha; Steve Jurvetson; K065167; Kamira; Prasad Kholkute; Kiev.victor; Masami Kihara; A And J King; Patryk Kosmider; Liudmila Kotvitckaia; Lazyllama; Aija Lehtonen; Ioannis Liasidis; Felix Lipov; Lterlecka; Luciano Mortula - Lgm; Maciek Lulko; Lunamarina; Mapics; Maridav; Jose L Marin; Rob Marmion; Maziarz; Mcginnly; Mistervlad; Mkos83; Luciano Mortula; Mrsellacott; Christian Mueller; Casa Nayafana; Andrei Nekrassov; Niepo; Laura Nolte; Noyanyalcin; Nui7711; Stig Nygaard; Olavs; Lukasz Pajor; Pres Panayotov; Paolo Paradiso; Patche99z; Pajor Pawel; Gary Perkin; Mach Photos; Vdb Photos; Photo.ua; Pio3; Pisaphotography; Pj_photography; Prettyawesome; Gts Productions; Qq7; Redcoat; Rihardzz; Rika-sama; R.nagy; Roberto La Rosa; Andreas Rose; Alexandre Rotenberg; S4svisuals; Sagesolar; S.borisov; Seancooneyfoto; Fedor Selivanov; Francesco Sgroi; Skyearth; Archer All Square; David Steele; Stephantom; Boris Stroujko; Teerinvata; Andreas Tille; Pitcha Torranin; Traveljunction; Anibal Trejo; Ttstudio; Tupungato; Yuri Turkov; Tuuraan78; Ints Vikmanis; Ewelina Wachala; Walter_g; William Warby; Cedric Weber; Warundhorn Weerasaktara; Zgphotography.

Some text adapted from Wikipedia and its contributors, used and modified under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) license. Map data from OpenStreetMap and its contributors, used under the Open Data Commons Open Database License (ODbL).

This book would not exist without the love and contribution of my wonderful wife, Jennie. Thank you for all your ideas, support and sacrifice to make this a reality. Hello to our terrific kids, Redford and Roxy.

Thanks to the many people who have helped PhotoSecrets along the way, including: Bob Krist, who answered a cold call and wrote the perfect foreword before, with his wife Peggy, becoming good friends; Barry Kohn, my tax accountant; SM Jang and Jay Koo at Doosan, my first printer; Greg Lee at Imago, printer of my coffe-table books; contributors to PHP, WordPress and Stack Exchange; mentors at SCORE San Diego; Janara Bahramzi; Donna Coleman, photographer and friend; my bruver Pat and his family Emily, Logan, Jake and Cerys in St. Austell, Cornwall; family and friends in Redditch, Cornwall, Oxford, Bristol, Coventry, Manchester, London, Philadelphia and San Diego.

Thanks to everyone at distributor National Book Network (NBN) for always being enthusiastic, encouraging and professional, including: Jed Lyons, Jason Brockwell, Kalen Landow (marketing guru), Spencer Gale (sales king), Vicki Funk, Karen Mattscheck, Kathy Stine, Mary Lou Black, Omuni Barnes, Ed Lyons, Sheila Burnett, Max Phelps, Jeremy Ghoslin and Les Petriw. A special remembrance thanks to Miriam Bass who took the time to visit and sign me to NBN mainly on belief.

The biggest credit goes to you, the reader. Thank you for (hopefully) buying this book and allowing me to do this fun work. I hope you take lots of great photos!

Index

2

3

A

B

C

E

F

G

H

I

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

V

W

Y

Get the full version
Available now as a book
Coming soon as an app
200+
views
for
$19.95
for
$4.99
Your feedback has been sent. Thank you!
Feedback