PhotoSecrets Kew Gardens

A Photographer’s Guide

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Kew Gardens
A Photographer’s Guide
Andrew Hudson

Photos

King William’s TempleDaniel Case/Wikipedia

Kew Gardens

110 views to photograph
Princess of Wales ConservatoryDiliff/Wikipedia
Private doorway dead treeMendhak/Flickr
southwest sideJim Linwood/Flickr
Temple of AeolusChuck b./Flickr
The White Greyhound of RichmondStephen Boisvert/Wikipedia
with Queen‘s GardenLaura Nolte/Flickr
Wounded Angel IMira66/Flickr
Zen GardenPrl42/Wikipedia
The door into The Secret GardenJim Linwood/Flickr
Hercules and Achelous FountainAirwolfhound/Flickr
looking upSaw2th/Flickr
Mediterranean Garden and King William’s TempleRabe/Wikipedia
The Red Dragon of WalesSaragoldsmith/Flickr
Seven Slate TowersJim Linwood/Flickr
from southeast 2David Stanley/Wikipedia
Tower of AeolusDaniel Case/Wikipedia
view with lavenderT3W_boston/Pixabay
with pond sunsetMike_fleming/Flickr
with right urn and The PondEnglishhorn73/Wikipedia
bonsai trees in the Bonsai HouseC T Johansson/Wikipedia
Bootstrap DNAMira66/Flickr
Chinese Water DragonAshley Van Haeften/Flickr
Donatello’s DavidKetrin1407/Flickr
The Falcon of the PlantagenetsIain Farrell/Flickr
Henry Moore reclining figure sculptureAndy Hay/Flickr
left side Queen’s GardenMike T/Flickr
The Lion of England [Kew Gardens]Spankie80004/Pixabay
Marianne North GalleryDinkum/Wikipedia
A Maximis ad MinimaJim Linwood/Wikipedia
Nash ConservatoryPatche99z/Wikipedia
Out In The FieldsPatche99z/Wikipedia
from southeastDiliff/Wikipedia
Temple of BellonaHesekiel/Wikipedia
Water LilyChris/Wikipedia
Waterlily HousePrl42/Wikipedia
west lion with Palm HouseKaren B Levy/Wikipedia
aloe ciliarisDinkum/Wikipedia
Barrel cactiFæ/Wikipedia
David Nash SculptureVicky25/Wikipedia
Drinking water fountainJames Petts/Flickr
giant water pitcherFæ/Wikipedia
Queen Charlotte’s CottagePrl42/Wikipedia
Queen‘s Garden from Kew PalaceIstvánka/Wikipedia
Replica of the Medici VasePeter Trimming/Geograph
Rose pergolaDinkum/Wikipedia
Sackler CrossingPrl42/Wikipedia
Shirley Sherwood Gallery of Botanic ArtPrl42/Wikipedia
Stag BeetleDinkum/Wikipedia
Temple of ArethusaJonathan Cardy/Wikipedia
tower from walkwayJim Linwood/Flickr
with Palm HouseAmanda Slater/Flickr
Elizabeth GateEwan Munro/Wikipedia
Secret GardenIstvánka/Wikipedia
walkway from walkwayDiliff/Wikipedia
Laburnum pergolaLa Citta Vita/Flickr

Contents

Maps

Map of Kew Gardens

Map of Entrance

Map of East

Map of North

Map of South

About PhotoSecrets

 
 
 

Foreword

A great travel photo­graph requires you to be in the right place at the right time to capture that special moment. Professional photo­graphers have a short-hand phrase for this: “F8 and be there.”

There are countless books that can help you with photo­graphic technique, the “F8” portion of that equation. But until now, there’s been little help for the other, more critical portion of that equation, the “be there” part. To find the right spot, you had to expend lots of time and shoe leather to essentially re-invent the wheel.

In my career as a professional travel photo­grapher, well over half my time on location is spent seeking out the good angles. Andrew Hudson’s PhotoSecrets does all that legwork for you, so you can spend your time photo­graphing instead of wandering about. I wish I had one of these books for every city I photo­graph on assignment.

PhotoSecrets can help you capture the most beautiful sights with a minimum of hassle and a maximum of enjoyment. So grab your camera, find your favorite PhotoSecrets spots, and “be there!”

About Bob Krist

Bob Krist has photo­graphed assignments for National Geographic, National Geographic Traveler, Travel/­Holiday, Smithsonian, and Islands. He won “Travel photo­grapher of the Year” from the Society of American Travel Writers in 1994, 2007, and 2008.

For National Geographic, Bob has led round-the-world tours and a traveling lecture series. His book In Tuscany with Frances Mayes spent a month on The New York Times’ bestseller list and his how-to book Spirit of Place was hailed by American Photo­grapher magazine as “the best book about travel photo­graphy we’ve ever read.”

The parents of three sons, Bob and his wife live in New Hope, Pennsylvania.

Welcome

Thank you for reading PhotoSecrets. As a fellow fan of travel and photo­graphy, I hope this guide will help you quickly find the most visually stunning places, and come home with equally stunning photo­graphs.

PhotoSecrets is designed to show you all the best sights. Flick through, see the classic views, and use them as a departure point for your own creations. Flick through, enjoy the photos, and see which places inspire you. Get comp­osition ideas, lighting tips, and a brief history. It’ll be like traveling with a location scout and a pro-photo­grapher by your side.

The idea for PhotoSecrets came during a trip to Thailand, when I tried to find the exotic beach used in the James Bond movie The Man with the Golden Gun. None of the guidebooks I had showed a picture, so I thought a guidebook of postcard photos would be useful for us photographers. If you have any ides for improvements, please send me an email at ahudson@photosecrets.com.

Now, start exploring — and take lots of photos!

About Andrew Hudson

Originally an engineer, Andrew Hudson started PhotoSecrets in 1995. His first book won the Benjamin Franklin Award for Best First Book and his second won the Grand Prize in the National Self-Published Book Awards.

Andrew has published 15 nationally-distributed photo­graphy books. He has photo­graphed assignments for Macy’s, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Men’s Health and Seventeen, and been a location scout for Nikon. His photos and articles have appeared in Alaska Airlines, National Geographic Traveler, Shutterbug Outdoor and Nature photo­graphy, Where, and Woman’s World.

Andrew has a degree in Computer Engineering from Manchester University and a certificate in copyright law from Harvard Law School. Born in Redditch, England, he lives with his wife, two kids, and two chocolate Labs, in San Diego, California.

Introduction

At a Glance

Name:Kew Gardens
What:Botanical garden
Fame:Houses “largest and most diverse botanical and mycological collections in the world.”
Opened:1759
Founded:1840
Size:121 hectares (300 acres)
Living plants:30,000 species
Herbarium:over seven million preserved plant specimens
Award:World Heritage Site
Location:London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, England
GPS:30.25, -97.75
Website:kew.org

Kew Gardens is a botanical garden in southwest London that houses the “largest and most diverse botanical and mycological collections in the world.” Founded in 1840, from the exotic garden at Kew Park in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, UK, its living collections include more than 30,000 different kinds of plants, while the herbarium, which is one of the largest in the world, has over seven million preserved plant specimens. The library contains more than 750,000 volumes, and the illustrations collection contains more than 175,000 prints and drawings of plants. It is one of London’s top tourist attractions and is a World Heritage Site.

Kew Gardens, together with the botanic gardens at Wakehurst Place in Sussex, are managed by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (brand name Kew), an internationally important botanical research and education institution that employs 750 staff and is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

The Kew site, which has been dated as formally starting in 1759, though it can be traced back to the exotic garden at Kew Park, formed by Lord Capel John of Tewkesbury, consists of 121 hectares (300 acres) of gardens and botanical glasshouses, four Grade I listed buildings, and 36 Grade II listed structures, all set in an internationally significant landscape.

Kew Gardens has its own police force, Kew Constabulary, which has been in operation since 1847.

Wikipedia

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